Africa’s Wild Dog Survival Fund

PBO Exemption No: 9300069753

We are an awareness building, fundraising support for those working with Africa’s wild dogs

Africa’s Wild Dog Survival Fund, is a registered South African Public Benefit Organisation established as a fundraising platform supporting those organisations working directly with the dogs.

The Team

The Wild Dog Survival Fund Team were drawn together by our love of African Wild Dogs and a passion to do whatever it takes to contribute to growing their numbers and ensure they survive.

Jocelin Kagan

Jocelin Kagan

Jocelin Kagan has always loved dogs. She had shown and bred Cairn Terriers. Jocelin finds solace in the bush where she senses the heartbeat of the animals and the earth. ‘The shock at realising the finality of our planets natural resources and its wildlife spurred me into action some years ago. I have found my voice and raise it for conservation through my commitment and work with African Wild Dogs.’

Liz Knight

Liz Knight

Elizabeth Knight returned to South Africa after forty years in Hong Kong and decided to ‘give back.’ ‘My passion has always been for wild dogs inspired by my father and his lessons about the strong social bonds and playful interactions within pack members and their extraordinary prowess as predators. ‘The formation of WDSF is crucial and timely and I am honoured to be part of this initiative.

Lynn De Keller

Lynn De Keller

Lynn De Keller does volunteer work for the riding school for the disabled which gave her an insight into the healing powers of horses and the wonderful benefits to these needy children. Having worked, shown and bred both Border Collies and Cairn Terriers, her love of dogs and caring for horses fits well with her life pattern of building relationships between people and animals. So it is with AWDSF, an organisation designed to create an awareness for this endangered species and to change people’s minds to care.

Cathy Bezuidenhout

Cathy Bezuidenhout

Dr Cathy Bezuidenhout, a graduate of Onderstepoort Veterinary School became interested in the work done in African Wild Dog conservation after realising how their numbers have declined to the point that they are faced with extinction. ‘Human behaviour is largely responsible for the declining numbers and educating people is the way to preserve these magnificent animals for future generations'.

Africa’s Wild Dog Survival Fund has partnered with: